TRUE CRIME REVIEW

EVIDENCE OF LOVE

FIVE Engrossing Stars

  • Authors: John Bloom, Jim Atkinson
  • Publication Date: May 1, 1985

I actually read this for the first time back in 1985 when I was a mere toddler. Well, maybe a little older than that. I grew up in Plano, TX (go Wildcats!) and I remember this Friday the 13th in 1980 almost like it was yesterday.

I had just graduated from high school a few days before. It was the hottest summer in a sweltering Texas history of summers. And most importantly, the very first Friday the 13th movie series was being released in theaters that night. Friday+the+13th+1980

But that afternoon, an average housewife walked in to her friend’s house after vacation Bible school  and butchered her with an ax. FORTY splintering and brutal whacks to her face.

This happened about 5 miles away in a new subdivision of homes right down the road from the Southfork Ranch of Dallas TV fame.

At first, there was news that an escaped mental patient was the killer. OMG. We were actually living out the Friday the 13th movie plot. The unresolved panic went on for a couple of weeks before an arrest was made. And it wasn’t a known psycho, it was Candy Montgomery. Sweet, beloved popular church member.

This case, more than any other in my life, shook me to the core. It was so close to home. It was so crazy. So bizarre. Our little town was obsessed with wanting to know why…I started reading anything I could get my hands on–which wasn’t much. We didn’t have Reddit to scour and hash out our theories and we didn’t have Twitter to get the latest updates. Heck, even the newspaper articles were already a couple of days old by the time they were published and delivered to the front driveway.

What we did have was gossip. Chatter, stories and tales, but all speculation. None of it made sense. You can imagine by the time this fantastic book was published a few years later, it was snatched off the shelves so fast I’m sure it broke records. Finally we could have some answers about what happened that unforgettable day.

John Bloom and Jim Atkinson were local journalists at the time and somehow, who knows how, they were able to get up close and personal with all the major players in this demented story. I think journalists were a lot more trusted and respected back then. You don’t see a lot of murder defendants spilling their stories these days.

We hear first-hand from Candy Montgomery, her childhood, her strict upbringing, salacious details of her marriage. She tells Bloom exactly what happened that murderous day in a chilling, hypnotic tone. I don’t believe Montgomery has ever given anymore interviews–so it is especially effective in this book. Bloom takes us from beginning to end (yes, the shocking trial verdict!!!) and leaves no details out. Yes, it’s juicy and sensationalist, but utterly mesmerizing.

I hadn’t thought of this book in awhile, but I saw it mentioned in a Goodreads Blog featuring psychological suspense authors Laura Lippman and Alice Bolin sharing their favorites. Thanks for reminding me to have another look at one of the best true crime novels out there. I’m pleased to report it still holds up. 38 years later, it is as bizarre and fascinating as ever.

Brush with infamy note: I sat right behind Candy Montgomery at a movie in Dallas. This was either right before her trial or afterwards, I don’t remember which movie (definitely not Friday the 13th) probably a rom-com– because I remember her smiling and laughing during it. Yes, I stared at her for a long time. Trying to read her face. I could not see any traces of an ax-murderer.  She was just perfectly ordinary:  permed teacher-hair and lovely skin and white teeth. Which was all the more terrifying to me.

evidence of love